8.31.2012

Photo Tip Friday


Today’s photo tips are on doing a photo shoot with people.

While we all love to grab the camera and snap shot here and there, we can learn to use our talents for other people. One way to do this is to do a photo shoot for special occasions like weddings, anniversaries, engagements, births, graduations etc.

Here are some shots of an engagement shoot that I did a few years ago. Next week, I’ll show shots from a more recent shoot. One thing you will notice is a big difference in how the overall shoot turned out. Why? Because each couple is different. As a photographer, you need to learn to clue in to what’s important to them and how to make them feel most comfortable.

So, let’s get started.




I caught a sweet moment between them while they were just sitting on a bench. Notice how Doug’s hand is lovingly holding Patience. This picture speaks of the tenderness in their relationship.










Another mood shot was with the hydrangeas in front and the two of them in the background, just focusing on each other. Their love and tenderness shows through.












Here’s the next one. Notice the little gleam in Patience's eyes? Doug even cracked a smile for me.








 
Then, I took a close up of Patience, focusing on her intense eyes. The black and white makes her stand out.





 
Finally, here’s a fun one of her. Can you see the personality in her hidden grin? We had fun with the pictures.





 
To be honest, getting his picture taken wasn’t a comfortable thing for Doug. But working with him, and making him feel more comfortable yielded some good results.

So, experiment a little with your shoots. Try close-ups, talk to the couple, say funny or off the wall things to make them laugh and have your camera ready!


Hope these tips help.           

Keep on clicking.

Mary

8.28.2012

Wordless Wednesday

Okay, so this week isn't completely wordless. Anyone feel like they're weathering storms in life right now? This is a reminder of the beauty to be found in the midst of the storm. (And yes, I am talking to myself as well.)

Amazing Lightning Storm

Lightning Display
If you leave a link, I'll be happy to pop by and visit your blog and leave a comment as well.
(It may take me a couple of days, but I'll get there!)
Have a blessed day and thanks for stopping by!

8.26.2012

Monday's Musings

I'll let you in on a secret. I'm trying to grow my blog.

Why should this interest you? Because I want your blog to grow, too!

I admit that I've had some help in learning what to do. I have a friend. And her advice is really working. So I would like to introduce you to my friend and Social Media Coach, Edie Melson.

Edie Melson
Edie has a great blog entitled The Write Conversation. She makes sure her info is up to date and useful. She has tips on growing your blog, using social media, tips for writing (which applies whether or not you have a blog), and weekend worship.

I'd love it if you go to her site to check it out. You may learn a thing or two.

I can attest to the fact that I'm following her advise and my blog is growing. But I want to share this wonderful information with you!

Here are a couple of head shots of Edie. She's one of my favorite people to do photo shoots with!

Edie Melson


Go check out her site and let me know what you think!

Thanks for stopping by! See you on Wordless Wednesday.

8.24.2012

Photo Tip Fridays

One Subject – Multiple Shots

Today’s post is about using different perspectives and I have photos of a beautiful horse to illustrate how you can take multiple shots of one subject and keep it interesting.

So, while on a hike, I came across this scene. The rider graciously allowed me to take some photos. As you can see from the first shot, I have taken a vertical picture of the horse. Notice that I haven’t cut the horse off at the knees. I also made sure there was an equal amount “blank space” around the horse and rider. This is a nice overall shot, but watch what happens when I take a horizontal shot.




This shot has a different feel to it. One photo isn’t necessarily better than the other. The horizontal picture does give you a better feel for how big the horse is than the vertical picture.







But let’s move in closer. Here’s a shot of the horse’s head. Notice how different this looks from my first two photos. It’s focusing more on the horse, rather than the horse and rider. And you can see the head covering more clearly.







And let’s move in once more. I focused the shot on the horse’s eye. It captures more of the horse’s personality. Look at those lashes! Again, this photo show cases the subject in a very different way than the first three pictures.





When you come across a scene that catches your eye, explore the subject from different perspectives.

Hope this tip helps.

Keep on clicking.

Mary




8.22.2012

Wordless Wednesday


Three Generations, Mother, Daughter, Granddaughter



Thanks for stopping by. If you are so kind as to leave a comment or link, I will do my best to drop by your site for a visit. Have a great Wordless Wednesday.

8.15.2012

Wordless Wednesday

Sunflower on Wordless Wednesday

Wordless Wednesday

If you are so kind as to leave a comment or link up, I'll be happy to come visit and leave you a comment as well! Happy WW!


8.10.2012

Photo Tip Fridays


Today’s tip for taking better photographs is about Perspective.

I noticed some delicate roses running up a wrought iron railing in my neighbor’s yard.  After checking with her, I set about taking pictures of the flowers.


This first shot isn’t really all that special. But it shows what caught my eye. It has soft colors against strong lines and is generally interesting. Well, at least to me.

But there’s no well-defined focal point in this shot.






So, I changed my perspective and walked to the foot of the stairs. That’s when I took this photo. This is closer to what I was trying to capture. Notice the strong black line of the railing that cuts through the photograph. It’s in stark contrast to the soft greens and yellows of the vegetation. And, the sharp right angles of the brick stairs also form a contrast.










Then, I sat down on the stairs and looked through the railing. I used the wrought iron to frame the picture and moved in close on a clump of roses. Again, by changing my perspective, I created a completely different feel to a photo of the same subject.












Finally, I set my camera on the railing and looked back up. This is my favorite shot. I love the lines and softness, juxtaposed next to each other.






The lesson here is that when you see something that catches your fancy, try a different perspective to see how the photographs come out. Some may work and some may not. But push yourself and keep getting better. 


I hope this tip helps. 

Keep on clicking!

Mary

Wise Eyes




This is a dear, sweet lady I met whose eyes tell such an interesting tale.

8.03.2012

Photo Tip Friday


Friday Photography Tip: Using parallel lines in photos.


A more advanced technique in taking pictures is learning to use parallelism. This photography tip will take your photographs to a new level. It’s not a tool that you would use everyday. But once you start looking for it, you will be pleasantly surprised how it improves some shots.

Wild Turkeys
Here’s a shot of a couple of wild turkeys. The turkeys take a prominent place in the photo. But notice the barbed wire that literally frames the picture? It makes the photo more interesting. And, as in writing, the barbed wire provides a hook for your viewer. Literally and figuratively. Why is there barbed wire in the shot? Where was this taken? A plain shot becomes more interesting.

Lovely Roses
Here’s another shot. Notice how the rose in the front is clear while the rose in the background is blurred. The rose in the background parallels the rose in the foreground even though one is in focus and the other one isn’t.





Icy Flowers
I love this photo for a couple of reasons. One is for the parallelism. The two stalks of the plants are naturally parallel to each other. But I also love the fact that these early spring blossoms are encased in ice. It makes the shot distinct and different than what you expect to see.

You may have to look a little harder to find parallelism in a shot, but when you do, you’ll have a better photograph for it.

If you want me to pop by your site and look at some of you shots, just let me know.

Hope this tip helps.

Keep on clicking.



Mary